5 Ways to Eliminate Arm Pump

You know that feeling when you are riding, your grip starts to fade, you almost crash around every turn, and now your forearms feel like they are about to pop. This is an issue for many motocross riders and it is absolutely frustrating. So in today’s article we are going to give you five ways to start eliminating your arm pump.

Would you perform a dead lift and hold the barbell for the next 20 minutes just for fun. This essentially how arm pump sets in. You hold on for dear life and your forearms become filled with blood which increases the internal pressure of the forearms.

The build up in pressure the blood vessels start to get chocked off. This pressure does not allow the blood to exit the forearms efficiently.

Many ride holding the bars with a death grip and tax their forearm muscles to the point they can not use their hands anymore.

So first thing we need to fix is your technique when riding motocross.

Fix Riding Technique for Arm Pump

When the bike is under acceleration or deceleration you need to squeeze the bike with your legs. Squeezing the bike with your legs hold your body in position while taking the majority of your weight off of your arms.

This may seem easier said then done, but you have to practice this in order for the technique to be second nature so you can alleviate arm pump.

One technique to try off of the track is to find a long straight away and accelerate then decelerate using only one hand. Squeeze the bike and accelerate so that you do not fall off of the bike, decelerate and sit back while squeezing the bike to take the weight off of your arms.

This one technique made a huge difference in my riding after practicing over and over till this became second nature.

So lean forward when you accelerate around the track and sit back when decelerating to alleviate your arm pump art the track.

Stretching to Fix Arm Pump

Stretching is probably the most underutilized tool when it come to motocross training. We do not need large ranges of motion as we ride around the track but one thing we can not ignore is crashing. In motocross its not if, its when you crash.

Preventing injures should be part of the training. When you are out on the track the unfortunate part id that you can not predict how someone is going to ride, if that happen to cross rut during a jump, or arm pump sets in on them as they now ride recklessly.

When stretching for arm pump we have to stretch the pathway that the blood flows in and out of the arm. If we just focus on the forearm we missed everything beyond.

So one stretch that really opens up the pathways is the wall stretch. Turn your palm up and place it into the wall about shoulder height. Press your hand flat into the wall and slowly turn way from the wall. Squeeze the muscles in the back to increase the stretch. Hold this position for 2 seconds and the repeat the process. Follow this technique for 10 repetitions holding the last rep for 10 seconds. Do this 3-5 times a week as this will help your arm pump immensely.

Hydrate Hydrate Hydrate to Prevent Arm Pump

We know that we need to stay hydrated as motocross athletes. We reach for the sports drinks and drink this sugary beverage thinking we are staying hydrated. This couldn’t further from the truth. I love the sports and energy drink companies as sponsors, but the products unfortunately have no benefit to your body.

If you want to replenish electrolytes you have to use electrolytes not sugar. So here is what I do with my gallon jug of water.

I add about an 1/8 of a teaspoon of Pink Himalayan Salt to a gallon of water. That’s it.

The reason why is that water follows salt in the body. As long as you have a quality source of salt and minerals the body will stay hydrated.

You want your blood to have a good consistency especially with an endurance sport like motocross.

Some riders take aspirin before they ride to thin the blood thinking it help with arm pump. I personally never recommend this to my riders. The simple fact that if a rider gets injured and starts to bleed, the blood clotting mechanism has now been compromised. This slows the healing process down.

So stay hydrated and train better without using over the counter meds for arm pump.

Bike Set up is Causing Arm Pump

Imagine you are trying to stand up but you keep getting pushed down. This is how I explain to my athletes this is what it is like when you fight a bike that is not set up for you and the conditions you are riding.

If you are having a hard time turning as the bike in a rut, berm or flat turn your suspension might be an issue.

To set your bike up properly you have to make sure suspension springs are set to your body weight. This enable you to use more of the suspension as you ride the track. Then you have to play with the adjustment screws on the suspension.

Endurance Strength Training for Arm Pump

There seems to a this myth that goes around the motocross community that weight training makes arm pump worse. The focus needs to be on the technique in the weight room and the technique on the bike.

These are two different techniques that every rider needs to be aware of. When weight training you have to create strength and endurance in every muscle of the body. I have seen multiple video talk about being loose in the gym. How the hell are you going to lift the weight if you have a loose grip? You can not do it. This is where the gym technique does not transfer on to the bike.

Bike technique you have to lean forward to take the resistance off of the arms and put it into the legs. These two techniques are not interchangeable when on the bike. They need to be used in a way that benefits the rider when in the weight room or on the bike. This is a skill every rider need to work on when utilizing weight training for motocross.

If you would like to train with me then all you have to do is apply so we can get you focused in on what you need to do inorder for you to start seeing your results sooner.

Tap or click the button below and I will personally reach out to you over the phone. 

I look forward to speaking with you.

-RJ

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